Question for the Crews: Which do you prefer, take-offs or landings, and why?

This week’s question:  Which do you prefer, take-offs or landings, and why?

Here’s what your co-workers had to say!
"Landings. The last landing of the day before we go to the hotel to sleep and eat is the best, especially after a long day!" Madison Skeim, RDU FA
“Landings. The last landing of the day before we go to the hotel to sleep and eat is the best, especially after a long day!” Madison Skeim, RDU FA
"Landings are pretty interesting, especially when you're still trying to walk up and down the aisle and there's also turbulence. Passengers seem to be so amazed that you're still standing! I also like landings when you have beautiful scenery to look at. I like take-offs if there are kids on the plane who are new to flying. It's like a rush of excitement for them." Monique Moses, RDU FA
“Landings are pretty interesting, especially when you’re still trying to walk up and down the aisle and there’s also turbulence. Passengers seem to be so amazed that you’re still standing! I also like landings when you have beautiful scenery to look at. I like take-offs if there are kids on the plane who are new to flying. It’s like a rush of excitement for them.” Monique Moses, RDU FA
"I definitely enjoy take-offs, reveling in the anticipation on the faces of all the passengers. I've seen grown men and children alike get excited when we lurch forward and start to barrel down the runway. And then there's all of the tasking once we're in the air. As Flight Attendant B, it's like walking down the aisles at a party you're hosting, meeting all of the bright and sometimes angry faces. As Flight Attendant A, you get to pack FA B up and send him/her on their way and get into the swing of things in the galley. I guess I like starting an adventure more than ending it!" Haven Stapleton, DEN FA
“I definitely enjoy take-offs, reveling in the anticipation on the faces of all the passengers. I’ve seen grown men and children alike get excited when we lurch forward and start to barrel down the runway. And then there’s all of the tasking once we’re in the air. As Flight Attendant B, it’s like walking down the aisles at a party you’re hosting, meeting all of the bright and sometimes angry faces. As Flight Attendant A, you get to pack FA B up and send him/her on their way and get into the swing of things in the galley. I guess I like starting an adventure more than ending it!” Haven Stapleton, DEN FA
"Take-off! Just the 'need for speed'!" Gene Savard, STL FA
“Take-off! Just the ‘need for speed’!” Gene Savard, STL FA
"Take-off. I love going fast." Eli Burch, STL FA
“Take-off. I love going fast.” Eli Burch, STL FA
"As a passenger, I prefer take-offs. Ever since I was a young boy, the take-off has always defined the flight for me. The acceleration, the noise of the engines and the realization that the flight is finally getting underway was then, and remains today the part of a flight I prefer most when I am a passenger.  As a pilot however, the landing is by far and away the best part of the flight for me. When you factor in the weather, winds and field conditions, it is invariably the most challenging part of the flight and solely relies on the individual at the controls. It is the closest we come to "old school" flying in its purest since--no automation or computers--just a pilot competing with himself, the airplane and the elements. And yes, every landing is graded in my head." Randy Bratcher, STL Chief Pilot
“As a passenger, I prefer take-offs. Ever since I was a young boy, the take-off has always defined the flight for me. The acceleration, the noise of the engines and the realization that the flight is finally getting underway was then, and remains today the part of a flight I prefer most when I am a passenger.
As a pilot however, the landing is by far and away the best part of the flight for me. When you factor in the weather, winds and field conditions, it is invariably the most challenging part of the flight and solely relies on the individual at the controls. It is the closest we come to “old school” flying in its purest since–no automation or computers–just a pilot competing with himself, the airplane and the elements. And yes, every landing is graded in my head.” Randy Bratcher, STL Chief Pilot

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